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boehner is even interested in? >> i think it is probably something that he might consider. this is how negotiations work. congressional "fight club." they stake out their positions and sort of move closer together as they come together and actually meet and discuss this. there are couple options what they can do on the table. president signaled perhaps it doesn't have to be all about getting rates to clinton era levels. perhaps getting revenue from other places. i think that would be healthier, broader tax reform kind of deal made. i'm not sure whether they're all savvy enough to make that deal. i mean. martha: seems to me that is the major issue here. that is what john boehner was hinting at. he is suggesting that if you remove some of the loopholes that is a tax increase on the wealthy in this country. i feel like that is a message that has gotten across in perhaps a clear enough way. if you do same thing for u.s. corporations and roof move tax loopholes and don't end up in a situation where ge doesn't pay anything and small business pays through the nose. why isn't that kind of refo
of congress. republicans john boehner and mitch mcconnell and democrats nancy pelosi and harry reid. >> we had a very constructive meeting with the president to talk about america's fiscal problem. >> we all know something has to be done. >> it was good. i feel confident that a solution may be in sight. >> we're prepared to put revenue on the table, provided we fix the real problem. >> tax hikes and spending cuts could go into effect simultaneously if no deal is reached on the fiscal cliff by the end of the year, both sides have said they are willing to compromise. house speaker boehner says republicans realize that neither side will get everything it wants. >>> exactly one week after he abruptly resigned as head of the cia, david petraeus was back on capitol hill. he met yesterday behind closed doors to brief lawmakers on the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. according to lawmakers who were there, petraeus now says the attack was an act of terrorism and not the result of a spontaneous anti-western demonstration as initially reported. four americans died in the benghazi
. >>> if the fiscal cliff negotiations seem familiar, we've seen the movie before. president obama and speaker boehner were unable to reach a debt deal in 2001. one of the by-products of the inaction was a downgrade of the country's credit rating. could this happen again? and what would it mean for the nation's financial standing across the globe? joining me is jared bernstein, senior fellow at the center for budget policies and priorities. good to see you again, when it comes to the credit rating, we've seen it happen before. all three credit rating agencies are saying you've got to put a deal together in washington, if you guys in washington don't get it done, we're going to downgrade your credit. >> we've seen this movie before. it's not a good movie. i will remind viewers that the last time standard and poors did take us down a notch, it actually didn't hurt our ability to finance our debt at all. so that was kind of blown off by the markets, but this time could be different. there's one interesting wrinkle here. i do believe that if the political discourse, which is actually sounding a little bet
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
the microphone with pelosi and with reid and boehner at the side saying that revenue is on the table, but when the talks ramp back up after thanksgiving, is this an issue to be real negotiation or dig-in time? >> i hope it is time for a negotiation. look, if there is one thing that we learned from the president's campaign, he promised to raise taxes on the wealthy. and here is a news flash to the republicans out there, elections have consequences, and that is what he wants to do, and i'm sure he is going to accomplish some of that, but on either side when you dig in before the negotiations start, not only does it look bad, it makes the markets go up and down, and it creates instability, and insecurity among the people out here in the country feeling the pain and the brunt of some of the economic policies and the fact of the matter is that both sides need to come into it with some level of give and take, and that is how you govern and get it done, and if the president is going to ak kccomplish the polis that he did in first term that he promised in the second, he is going to have to get some of
republicans. listen who what house speaker john boehner said about that throwing cold water on it. >> at this point i think that the standing committees of the house whether they be the oversight committee or the intelligence committee are working diligently on these issues, and at this point i think that's appropriate. >> now, what john mccain and his colleagues are arguing is that there's too much stove piping going on. there are too many committees, and twoul today is a good example. there are hearings going on all over capitol hill and then probably will continue to be. they think it all should be streamlined into one committee, but, suzanne, using the term watergate, using the term coverup, saying what did he know, when did he know it, talking about the president, not exactly a way to get bipartisan support for something that, you know, democrats clearly don't want. it is absolutely -- you mentioned at the beginning, very, very tense, particularly between these two old rivals, john mccain and president obama. >> not the way to bite -- get the bipartisanship going. okay, dana.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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